It comes in a range of different colours (I like black).

Cons:. Depending on the source of your rope, it can be a real pain in the ass of a rope for a beginner, because the knots in what I got from the 1-8 dollar shop compact down like you wouldn’t believe. You’re going to need knots, which will take a tiny bit longer. It’s not dyeable; you’re stuck with the colour you buy. Cons:. As synthetic ropes go, it’s a bit pricey. The second lot of jute I purchased (200 metres, 8 mm) cost a lot more, but I was treating myself to a “savings milestone” so I’m not too upset. It was very good quality and exactly what I wanted (Esinem Jute). Answered the whole question, just like that. And wasn’t it just frustrating as hell?

5 millimetre tossa jute. Pros:. This is a very thin plastic webbing; it is not something you want to get too close to a naked flame, because it will melt. I strongly suspect that if you get droplets of hot wax on it, that it will cause stiff melted crackly bits in your rope, and that’s just not going to be pleasant for either the person tying or the person being tied. Different people will have different priorities. Those who care less about appearance or who are less attracted to shibari may go down the nylon route.

Pro: Nylon and MFP takes dye very well, resulting in brilliant color. Con: Poly pro or mixed material does not take color well or consistently. Pro: Perfectly fine for most types of bondage (other than suspension). Pro: Nylon and MFP takes dye very well, resulting in brilliant color. It feels really soft and smooth; very good flex, too. Likely to get quite compact knots with it. Exactly what I need. So, to sum up the whole post:.

It feels really soft and smooth; very good flex, too. Likely to get quite compact knots with it. I can’t give you as thorough a break down on it, but I made some observations. Nylon at Bunnings. Con: Poly pro or mixed material does not take color well or consistently. Con: Stretches in inconsistent/unpredictable ways.

I’m not actually a dick like that. I realize that what I just wrote may be true, but it’s not actually useful. I’d recommend 1/4? Cotton “Sash Cord”. It is a natural fiber, so it has decent “tooth” (enough friction so that knots will hold well without special consideration). Nylon at Bunnings. Pros:. All the same pros as hemp, basically, with a few more thrown in. Jute makes for extremely good photos in it’s un-dyed state. I could whip this around someone’s wrists into a column tie in nothing flat, with little to no fear of friction burn. The knots made by this rope compact down quite small; however, it tends to remain relatively easy to unpick.